Editorial

Inside Out began this decade considering why it is that we who choose to come into the field of psychotherapy and why it is that we are drawn toward the humanistic approach. It would seem that in light of our recent AGM, this is an important place for us to return to and to remind ourselves of the principles from which the humanistic approach was conceived through the pioneering work of Carl Rogers. With nothing more than an invitation to take a moment to reflect, can we be still with questions such as: how do I act out of and hold on to the core values of unconditional positive regard; congruence and empathy? Is it enough to only hold onto these principles within the comfort and safety of my therapeutic relationships? Can I tolerate to be with my own brokenness, frailty and vulnerability? Can I find within myself a capacity to acknowledge when my response to another offers less than what I can offer a perfect stranger in my clinical space? Isn’t the greater challenge to live these principles in my dealings with those who are not coming to me for help?

We open this issue with another important conversation, one which brings us into relationship with the issues surrounding assisted suicide and IVF. The actress Ruth Hegarty talks with her sister Ursula Somerville about her experience of playing the part of a woman with M.S. who has made the decision to travel to Switzerland to undergo assisted suicide. From this place of sensitivity with such serious subjects we are drawn into the quiet and yet deeply evocative wonderings of Aiveen Farrelly in her article which explores the question; Who am I and ponders how to make sense and meaning? And from deep within a contemplative space we are invited to explore more of our humanity through a reproduction of an article titled; Anger: A sense of Belonging and Individualization by Jon and Troya Turner.

Is it any wonder that we need the pennings from our intrepid journalist Fiona Ferret, even if she is on probation! In her inimitable fashion Ms. Ferret takes the ridiculous to the sublime and brings a smile, or at the very least, offers some light relief… With the many gifts that can only come from a lifetime of experience and dedication in the field of psychotherapy, Shirley Ward in her article titled, Global Fractal Waves: A Reflection invites us to once again ponder our humanity at a time of world strife and to contemplate possibilities like walking on the moon, as though for the first time. And in the final article for this issue, Thomas Skovholt brings us right back to the work itself as he takes time to consider Practitioner’s Urgent Search for Answers: Knowledge from Research vs. Knowledge from Practice.

The Editorial Board continues to be grateful for all the pieces we receive for publication. We encourage each one of you to consider what you might like to contribute to your journal. If you feel you would like to make a contribution and feel you need some support, contact any member of the Editorial Board and we will be delighted to offer whatever support we can.

We would like to take this opportunity to wish each of you a very bright and restful summer…